Historical Society saves county founder's mansion
Once Upon a Time

Historical Society saves county founder's mansion

The headline in the Oct. 20, 1906, issue of The Quincy Daily Journal read: "To Save the Home of Quincy's Founder." The Historical Society was barely 10 years old when it decided to purchase the homestead of John Wood.

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1919 Mississippi bridge fire disrupted vital travel route
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1919 Mississippi bridge fire disrupted vital travel route

A fire on the Mississippi River bridge at Quincy on March 30, 1919, disrupted area lives. The cause of the blaze was a mystery, but it had begun well before anyone noticed.

Letter campaign rescued Civil War prisoner
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Letter campaign rescued Civil War prisoner

Late in the afternoon of the second day of the Battle of Chickamauga in Georgia, William H. Tillson and a fellow soldier went in search of water for their company.

Quincy soldier wrote of trials of being prisoner of Civil War
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Quincy soldier wrote of trials of being prisoner of Civil War

William, or Willie as he was known, was the eldest son of Robert Tillson, an early and prominent Quincy resident. Arriving here in 1828, Tillson opened a store on the southeast corner of Fourth and Maine streets.

Former slave, doctor created towns' antislavery link
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Former slave, doctor created towns' antislavery link

Abolitionists were organizing across the country as soon as a territory became a state. Some antislavery Americans met at lectures or rallies, and some serendipitously crossed paths as they traveled west to the new states in the expanding United States.

'Freedom papers' tell stories of people of color in 1800s
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'Freedom papers' tell stories of people of color in 1800s

In 1819, less than a year after Illinois became a state, the first Illinois General Assembly passed "An Act Respecting Free Negroes, Mulattos, Servants, and Slaves." The act, in 25 sections, outlined how free persons of color should be registered.

Group created historical society to keep city 'treasures'
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Group created historical society to keep city 'treasures'

"Mr. S.H. Emery, Sr., is interesting himself in the organization of a historical society for Quincy," The Quincy Daily Whig reported on June 11, 1896. So begins the newspaper accounts of the origins of the Historical Society of Quincy and Adams County.

Quincy's location key to anti-slavery network flourishing
Once Upon a Time

Quincy's location key to anti-slavery network flourishing

Quincy was an ideal settlement for abolitionists on the expanding Western frontier after the Missouri Compromise of 1820.

Riding early streetcars could be an adventure
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Riding early streetcars could be an adventure

Quincy had some form of trolley transportation beginning in 1865 when the line began at about Fifth and Maine streets and went north for more than a mile to Locust Street.

Teenie Weenie Orchestra made big musical impact
Once Upon a Time

Teenie Weenie Orchestra made big musical impact

The Teenie Weenie Orchestra presented its first concert to the Round Table Club and other invited guests on Dec. 14, 1922, in the Webster School auditorium.